Tuesday, January 31, 2023
HomeCauseCan Arthritis Cause Back Pain

Can Arthritis Cause Back Pain

Important Considerations For People With Arthritis Of The Hip

Is Your Back Pain / Backache from Arthritis? 3 Quick Tests

There is no cure for arthritis. Typically, it starts gradually and worsens over time. Eventually, all forms of arthritis of the hip may permanently damage the hip joint. While osteoarthritis is more common in older people, there are forms of arthritis that affect younger people.

Fortunately, there are things that can be done to help minimize the effect of arthritis, and we are glad to discuss these option.

Arthritis Statistics*:

  • 22% of the U.S. population in 2010 reported some form of arthritis
  • Among adults over 65, 50% have some form of arthritis
  • The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis
  • Weight loss of just 11 pounds can reduce a womans risk of developing knee arthritis by 50%
  • Of working age people , one-third of those who had arthritis reported it limited their ability to work

*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

How Arthritis In The Back Is Diagnosed

Diagnosing arthritis in the back begins with taking your medical history and doing a physical exam of your back and legs to assess your mobility/flexibility and make sure your nerves are working properly. The doctor will ask questions about:

  • Where the pain is occurring
  • How long the pain has lasted
  • What the pain feels like/how severe it is
  • What situations/activities make the pain feel better or worse
  • How the pain is affecting/limiting your daily function

Imaging tests are usually needed to help confirm a diagnosis of arthritis. X-rays are typically the first imaging test ordered. They can joint damage/bone spurs, but cannot show damage to soft tissues such as muscles, ligaments, or bulging discs. Other tests may be ordered to look for changes or damage that is not visible on X-rays. These may include MRI, CT, ultrasound, bone scans, or other tests as needed. The gold standard to diagnose arthritis in the back is actually an injection called a medial branch block, but its not often necessary, says Dr. Kirschner.

If your doctor suspects you could have a type of inflammatory arthritis, they may order blood tests to look for signs of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein or erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

Other blood tests may look for genetic markers associated with axial spondyloarthritis, such as HLA-B27, or antibodies associated with rheumatoid arthritis .

What Are The Symptoms Of Sciatica

The symptoms of sciatica include:

  • Moderate to severe pain in lower back, buttock and down your leg.
  • Numbness or weakness in your lower back, buttock, leg or feet.
  • Pain that worsens with movement loss of movement.
  • Pins and needles feeling in your legs, toes or feet.
  • Loss of bowel and bladder control .

Don’t Miss: Advil Good For Back Pain

What Other Steps Can I Take To Manage Or Treat Ankylosing Spondylitis

In addition to standard AS treatments, these steps may also help ease inflammation and pain:

  • Eat a nutritious diet: Fried foods, processed meats and foods high in fat and sugar can have an inflammatory effect. Anti-inflammatory diets, such as the Mediterranean diet, may help fight inflammation.
  • Maintain a healthy weight: Obesity and excess weight puts pressure on joints and bones.
  • Limit alcohol consumption: Drinking too much alcohol can weaken bones and increase the risk of osteoporosis.
  • Stop smoking: Tobacco use accelerates spinal damage and intensifies pain. Your provider can help you quit smoking.

Back Pain Caused By Arthritis In The Knee

What causes lower back pain?

According to the book “Joint Structure and Function: A Comprehensive Analysis,” arthritis can lead to several symptoms that affect the rest of the body, mostly compensatory in nature 1. Back pain is likely the result of a domino effect from the individual favoring the non-affected knee.

If you are experiencing serious medical symptoms, seek emergency treatment immediately.

Also Check: Advil For Lower Back Pain

Changing Your Diet Wont Cure Psoriatic Arthritis

There is no known cure for psoriatic arthritis, and making dietary changes like going paleo or gluten free isnt a remedy. The good news, however, is that a healthy diet with plenty of anti-inflammatory fruits and vegetables thats low in fats and sugars can help keep psoriatic arthritis symptoms under control. Also try to steer clear of dairy and caffeine, which may aggravate psoriatic arthritis symptoms, says Dr. Markenson.

What Should I Know About Back Pain

Back pain is a very common problem and will affect many of us at some point during our lives.

The good news is that in most cases it isnt a serious problem, and it might just be caused by a simple strain to a muscle or ligament.

As far as possible, its best to continue with your normal everyday activities as soon as you can and to keep moving.

Being active and exercising wont make your back pain worse, even if you have a bit of pain and discomfort at first. Staying active will help you get better. Taking painkillers can help you do this.

Recommended Reading: Is Advil Good For Back Pain

Psoriatic Arthritis And Back Pain: What You Need To Know

Psoriatic arthritis is a inflammatory type of arthritis that develops in some people with psoriasis, an autoimmune disease that causes skin cells to build up and form scaly plaques. Psoriasis affects 74 million adults in the United States, and about 30% of patients diagnosed with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis.

Psoriatic arthritis causes inflammation in many joints of the body because the immune system is attacking its own joints. It commonly affects the lumbar spine, or low back.

Other Conditions That Cause Back Pain

Treating Back Pain Caused by Arthritis

Sometimes pain felt in the back actually originates elsewhere in the body. Such problems may include: prostate trouble in men problems with reproductive organs in women kidney diseases, such as an infection or kidney stone diseases of the intestines or pancreas, such as cancer or a blockage cancer that has spread to the spine multiple myeloma, a form of cancer of the bone and bone marrow curvature of the spine rarely, a tumor on the spinal cord

Read Also: Is Aleve Good For Back Pain

What Is Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of arthritis that causes chronic spine inflammation. Ankylosing spondylitis inflames the sacroiliac joints located between the base of the spine and pelvis. This inflammation, called sacroiliitis, is one of the first signs of AS. Inflammation often spreads to joints between the vertebrae, the bones that make up the spinal column. This condition is known as spondylitis.

Some people with AS experience severe, persistent back and hip pain and stiffness. Others have milder symptoms that come and go. Over time, new bone formations may fuse vertebrae sections together, making the spine rigid. This condition is called ankylosis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis In The Neck

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease where the bodys immune system mistakenly attacks the lining of the joints. It often starts in the smaller joints of your hands and feet and can spread to other parts of the body like the neck as the disease progresses. This typically doesnt happen until years after the onset of arthritis symptoms.

Neck pain is the primary symptom of rheumatoid arthritis in the neck, with the severity varying from person to person. You may feel a dull or throbbing ache in the back of your neck around the base of the skull. Joint swelling and stiffness can make it hard to move from side to side.

The difference between rheumatoid arthritis neck pain and a neck injury is that stiffness and pain from an injury can gradually improve over days or weeks. Rheumatoid arthritis in the neck may not get better it can worsen if left untreated. Even if symptoms improve, inflammation, swelling, and stiffness can return with rheumatoid arthritis in the neck.

Recommended Reading: Home Remedy For Arthritis Pain In Hands

Don’t Miss: Advil Or Ibuprofen For Back Pain

Questions To Ask The Doctor About Medications:

  • What will the medication do?
  • How long will it take before I notice results?
  • What is the name of the medication? Is there a generic brand?
  • Are there side effects I should know about?
  • How should I take the medication ?
  • How often should I take the medication?
  • What should I do if I forget to take a dose at the specified time?
  • Let your doctor know if you are taking other medications. Sometimes certain medications cannot be taken together.

Arthritis Does Not Cause More Back Pain

Can arthritis cause back pain?

The good news is that as horrible as these changes appear they have not been shown to cause an increase in back pain. Imaging of people with back pain shows that they have the same levels of osteoarthritis in the back as people of the same age without back pain. So what is going on?

It is likely that arthritis in the spine does not cause pain directly. It may, however, make it more likely that spinal joints will lock up and this can cause pain. As locking of the spinal joints is a common cause of back so-called facet joint syndrome- it seems that the effect of osteoarthritis is lost in the frequently occurring condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilisation by our chiropractors and physiotherapists unlock the joints that cause the pain and is an effective treatment for most back pain.

There is one a rare side effect of osteoarthritis where the bony spurs get so big that they press on the nerves. If they press on the nerves that go down the leg it can cause sciatica symptoms. If compression occurs around the spinal cord this can cause a condition called spinal stenosis. Then pain and numbness can occur in both legs especially after walking a short distance. Manual treatment and exercises can help but surgery is rare but sometimes necessary.

If you would like a free consultation to find out if arthritis might be contributing to your back pain then give us a call or book online above.

Reference

Read Also: How Much Advil Can I Take For Back Pain

How Common Is Spondylitis In People Who Have Psoriatic Arthritis

Spondylitis affects 7 to 32 percent of people living with psoriatic arthritis, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation. But these estimates may be low. Among patients with psoriatic arthritis, the presence of axial involvement, including sacroiliitis and spondylitis, is probably underrecognized, says Dr. Davis.

According to the Arthritis Foundation, most people who have psoriatic arthritis are diagnosed with spondylitis before the age of 40, although the condition can appear later in life. And psoriatic arthritisrelated back pain is more common in men than women.

People with axial arthritis may also experience more joint damage and nail changes from psoriatic arthritis. A study published in October 2018 in The Journal of Rheumatology analyzed 1,530 people with psoriatic arthritis and found that the 12.5 percent who had spondylitis were also more likely to have moderate to severe psoriasis.

The Chicken Or The Egg

If strength and volitional control is so poor in several muscle groups bilaterally in patients with knee arthritis, the classic which came first, the chicken or the egg question comes to mind. Does knee arthritis have such a dramatic impact on muscle impairments of the body or did these impairments precede, and potentially facilitate, the develop of knee arthritis?

There have some studies published that prospectively showed that weaker quadriceps strength was correlated to the development of knee arthritis. This makes sense to me, as it certainly appears that several of the above factors could be related to general deconditioning of the patient.

Perhaps there is a reason that we see bilateral deficits with the involved knee showing greater impairments. Maybe knee arthritis begins with a certain level of weakness, imbalances, and overall deconditioning. Then overtime, this deconditioning is superimposed with inhibition from the natural consequences of knee arthritis, such as effusion, pain, and inflammation.

Also Check: Aleve And Back Pain

How Is Osteoarthritis Of The Spine Diagnosed

The best way to confirm a diagnosis of osteoarthritis is by X-ray. The doctor will take a medical history and perform a physical exam to see if the person has pain, tenderness, loss of motion involving the neck or lower back, or if symptoms are suggestive, signs of nerve involvement such as weakness, reflex changes, or loss of sensation.

The doctor may order certain tests to aid in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the spine. These tests include:

  • X-rays to look for bone damage, bone spurs, and loss of cartilage or disc however, X-rays are not able to show early damage to cartilage.
  • Blood tests to exclude other diseases
  • Magnetic resonance imaging to show possible damage to discs or narrowing of areas where spinal nerves exit

Leg Pain From Hip Disorders

Common Causes of Back Pain

When the hip is affected, you may have groin pain on the affected side, reduced range of motion of the hip, thigh pain, knee pain, or buttocks pain. The pain usually does not go down below the knee, and there is no associated numbness or tingling. You may feel more pain when walking or standing, and the pain improves with rest. You may sense a limited range of motion when trying to get out of the car, chair or bed. Occasionally, pain in the hip could be secondary to inflammation of a hip bursa. This can happen if you have tight hip abductor muscles, difference in leg length or hip arthritis. Hip pain can also be caused by something more serious but less common, like fractures, tumors, infection or avascular necrosis.

Also Check: Back Pain Cleveland Clinic

Gradual Increase In Pain

Arthritis pain usually starts slowly, although it can appear suddenly in some cases.

At first, you may notice pain in the morning or after youve been inactive for a while. Your knees may hurt when you climb stairs, stand up from a sitting position, or kneel. It may hurt just to go for a walk.

You may also feel pain when youre simply sitting down. Knee pain that wakes you up from sleep can be a symptom of OA.

For people with RA, the symptoms often start in the smaller joints. They are also more likely to be symmetrical, affecting both sides of the body. The joint may be warm and red.

With OA, symptoms may progress rapidly or they may develop over several years, depending on the individual. They can worsen and then remain stable for a long time, and they can vary by days. Factors that may cause them to worsen include cold weather, stress, and excessive activity.

With RA, symptoms usually appear over several weeks, but they can develop or worsen in a few days. A flare can happen when disease activity increases. Triggers vary, but they include changes in medication.

With OA, this can be:

  • hard swelling, due to the formation of bone spurs
  • soft swelling, as inflammation causes extra fluid to collect around the joint

Swelling may be more noticeable after a long period of inactivity, like when you first wake up in the morning.

This is because RA is a systemic disease, which means it affects the whole body. OA, meanwhile, only has a direct impact on the affected joint.

Typical Symptoms Of Spinal Osteoarthritis

The full range of symptoms that typically occur with spinal arthritis includes some combination of the following:

  • The back and/or neck stiffness and pain tend to be worse in the morning , often called “first movement pain.”
  • The pain will usually subside to a more tolerable level over the course of the day as the person carries on his or her activities.
  • Pain and stiffness tend to get worse again in the evening.
  • Pain that disrupts sleep is often an indicator of osteoarthritis.
  • Swelling and warmth in one or more joints, particularly during weather changes .
  • Localized tenderness when the joint or affected area of the spine is pressed.
  • Steady or intermittent pain in a joint, which is often described as an aching type of pain. The pain may be aggravated by motion.
  • Loss of flexibility of a joint, such as inability to bend and pick something off the floor.
  • A crunching feeling or sound of bone rubbing on bone when the joint is moved , particularly notable in the neck.
  • A sensation of pinching, tingling, or numbness in a nerve or the spinal cord, which can occur when bone spurs form at the edge of the joints of the spine and irritate the nerves.

Also Check: Is Aleve Good For Lower Back Pain

What Are The Symptoms Of Spinal Arthritis

Symptoms of spinal arthritis may differ from person to person. In general, they may include:

  • Back and neck pain, especially in the lower back

  • Stiffness and loss of flexibility in the spine, such as being unable to straighten your back or turn your neck

  • Swelling and tenderness over the affected vertebrae

  • Feeling of grinding when moving the spine

  • Pain, swelling and stiffness in other areas of the body

  • Whole-body weakness and fatigue

  • Pain and numbness in your arms or legs if the nerves are affected

  • Headaches

Although back pain is a common symptom, not all people have it, even those with advanced spinal arthritis. On the other hand, some may experience pain even before arthritis can be seen on an X-ray.

In certain types of spondyloarthritis, eye inflammation may occur, causing pain, watery eyes and blurred vision.

Arthritis And The Spine

Lower Back Pain Due to Spinal Arthritis Non

The spine is made up of small, individual bones called vertebrae. They have the task of providing support for the spine. In the spine, arthritis can cause pain and stiffness that you feel most often in your neck and lower back. Cervical arthritis affects the neck and upper part of the spine.

Arthritis is an inflammation and swelling of the joints. The most common symptoms are joint pain and stiffness, and these symptoms typically worsen as you get older. There are more than 100 types of arthritis, with a few being much more common than others.

Four types of arthritis that affect the spine are:

Facet joint syndrome: This arthritis-like condition is the result of the breakdown of the joints between the bones of the spine. It can cause significant neck and back pain. In patients with facet joint syndrome, the cartilage within the facet joints breaks down and becomes inflamed. This causes pain and irritation of the nearby nerves.

Degenerative changes that affect the spine can cause weight to shift unevenly, placing an extra burden on the joints, preventing them from moving smoothly and causing irritation. The irritated and inflamed joints can cause intense pain.

Spinal stenosis: This type of arthritis results from new bone and tissue growth on the spinal column, causing narrowing of the spinal canal. In patients with spinal stenosis, the nerve roots become pinched and irritated, leading to painful burning, numbing, and tingling sensations.

  • Knees
  • Lower back
  • Hands
  • Skin

Read Also: Advil Or Aleve For Back Pain

RELATED ARTICLES

Most Popular