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When To Go To Dr For Back Pain

Ways To Tell That It Is Time To See A Chiropractor

When to See a Doctor for Back Pain

If you are dealing with Back Pain, you may think that it is not serious enough to see a chiropractor about it.

However, it could be.

It is important to seek medical attention as soon as you can in order to prevent permanent pain or damage to your body.

In this blog, we highlight 12 signs of back pain that tell you it is time to visit your local back pain doctor.

There are many sources of pain and dysfunction in the back, and if one of the muscles or joints is injured or inflamed, it can create pain that may be difficult to treat.

The spine is made up of 24 bones that are connected to muscles and ligaments that create the spinal column. This gives the body its form, function, and also holds and protects the spinal cord.

If the spine becomes injured, it can cause chronic back pain.

Some symptoms of back pain will scream at you to see a Chiropractor for treatment.

If you are ever in doubt about the severity and symptoms of pain that you are experiencing, it is always important to see a Chiropractor immediately for a proper diagnosis and treatment options.

Below, we highlight twelve signs that signal an immediate visit to the chiropractor’s office.

When Surgery May Help

Most back surgeries are done to treat nerve pain from herniated discs. Surgery might be an option when a disc problem causes pain in your leg that prevents you from doing everyday tasks. You may have pain, numbness, or tingling through your buttock and down the back of your leg or in the front of your thigh.

Other problems that may require surgery include:

  • A spinal fracture caused by an injury.
  • An infection in your spine.
  • A problem that causes your spine to be unstable.
  • A tumor in your spine.
  • Loss of feeling or weakness in your back or legs that gets worse over time.
  • Loss of control of your bowel or bladder.

Having surgery for a herniated disc or another back problem is a big decision. Talk to your doctor about it.

You’re Running A Fever

The flu can definitely make you run a fever and achiness, including in your back. However, if the fever is unresponsive to standard OTC medications, you could have a serious infection that needs treatment immediately. If you go to a doctor and they find an infection, they may prescribe antibiotics and a few days rest.

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How Long Will You Sit In The Waiting Room

The length of the average ED visit for back pain is around 5 hours. Depending on the other cases that come in that day, you may sit for three hours without being seen by a medical provider.

For someone with back pain, sitting for that amount of time feels uncomfortable, worrying and frustrating.

We know pain is increased by fear, worry and uncertainty. If you suspect something bad is going on and no one can reassure you otherwise, it is very hard to relax and move normally. This guarding and compensation is very normal to see in people with back pain, and unfortunately it can cause your pain to feel worse.

List Of Sciatica Signs And Symptoms

When Should You See a Doctor for Back Pain?

Sciatica is frequently associated with one or more of the following:

  • A sharp pain that makes walking or standing up close to impossible
  • Pain that radiates down one leg and also into the foot and toes
  • Leg pain experienced as tingling, searing, or burning
  • Chronic pain frequently affecting only one side of the buttocks or leg
  • Pain that gets more intense due to prolonged sitting but may become better as soon as you lie down or start walking.
  • Weakness or numbness, or difficulty when trying to move the foot, leg, or toes
  • Irregular and irritating pain, or can also be consistent and incapacitating
  • Symptoms that depend on the location of the pinched or irritated nerve

It is rare for sciatica to cause any damage to the tissue or sciatic nerve permanently. However, these symptoms may trigger whenever you cough, sneeze, or change positions. Some of them will trigger if you have a particular condition. For example, if a person has spinal stenosis, walking long distances or bending the body backward can cause excruciating back pain and other symptoms. If you have a lumbar herniated disc, then leaning forward will cause lower back pain.

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Types Of Doctors That Might Treat Your Back Pain

Back pain seems to be a problem that plagues so many, so it can be easy to operate under the assumption that treatment is relatively interchangeable. There are actually many different types of doctors that specialize in more specific areas of treatment when it comes to back injury or chronic pain.

It is important that you seek help from the correct type of doctor if you want your pain addressed in the most expedient and thorough fashion. Here is a more in-depth look at the most common types of spine doctors and how they might be able to help you with your pain.

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Whether you’re seeing your primary care doctor or sitting in the emergency department, a clinician is going to tell you what they think is the best path for your treatment. They might suggest certain diagnostic tests, medication, or action steps based upon their understanding of the issue. But it’s important to remember that health care is a team effort requiring the participation of the patient: you. MCG experts highly suggest that you ask questions so that you and your clinician can make empowered, informed decisions together. Here are some questions that you can bring with you to your clinic or hospital visit:

  • What is this test for?
  • How many times have you done this procedure?
  • When will I get my results?
  • Why do I need this treatment or drug?
  • Are there any alternatives?
  • Will this medicine interact with any meds I’m currently taking?
  • When and how should I take my medicine?
  • What should I do if I miss my dose?
  • What are the possible complications or side effects?
  • What can I do to help manage my care?
  • What should I avoid doing to prevent my back pain from getting worse?
  • What should I do if my symptoms start?
  • Where and when should I get help if I get worse?

Of course, this is not an exhaustive list so if there are any questions that come up for you before, after, or during the appointment, don’t be afraid to ask. Back pain is frustrating, but you don’t have to suffer alone.

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Coping With Chronic Back Pain

Low back pain can take a toll on your mental health. You may feel fear, frustration, and anger or have depression and anxiety because of ongoing pain. Those common reactions can make your pain last even longer. If pain is starting to get you down:

  • Let people know when you need a helping hand. Ask family members or friends to help out with physical tasks you can’t do right now.
  • Be honest with your doctor about your pain. Ask for a referral to a counselor or pain management specialist. A prescription antidepressant or antianxiety medicine may also help with chronic pain.
  • Work with your health professionals and your work supervisor to make a return-to-work plan, if needed. Ask for an ergonomic consultation if you need to learn how to do some of your job duties differently to avoid hurting your back again.

One Man’s Story:

“I started feeling sad and angry a lot. I didn’t want to do anything. My back was hurting more. I was having trouble focusing on my work. My life just started feeling smaller and smaller.”â Ravi

Risk Factors You Can Change With Lifestyle Changes

When to See a Doctor for Back Pain
  • Not getting regular exercise
  • Doing a job or other activity that requires long periods of sitting, heavy lifting, bending or twisting, repetitive motions, or constant vibration, such as using a jackhammer or driving certain types of heavy equipment
  • Smoking. People who smoke are more likely than people who don’t smoke to have low back pain.
  • Being overweight. Excess body weight, especially around the waist, may put strain on your back, although this has not been proved. But being overweight often also means being in poor physical condition, with weaker muscles and less flexibility. These can lead to low back pain.
  • Having poor posture. Slumping or slouching on its own may not cause low back pain. But after the back has been strained or injured, bad posture can make pain worse. “Good posture” generally means your ears, shoulders, and hips are in a straight line. If this posture causes pain, you may have another condition such as a problem with a disc or bones in your back.
  • Being under stress. Stress and other emotional factors are believed to play a major role in low back pain, particularly chronic low back pain. Many people unconsciously tighten their back muscles when they are under stress.

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How Is It Treated

Most low back pain will improve with basic first aid, which includes continuing to do light activity such as walking, and taking over-the-counter pain medicine as needed.

Walking is the simplest and maybe the best exercise for the lower back. It gets your blood moving and helps your muscles stay strong.

Your doctor or physical therapist can recommend more specific exercises to help your back muscles get stronger. These may include a series of simple exercises called . Strengthening the muscles in your can improve your posture, keep your body in better balance, and lower your chance of injury.

If your symptoms are severe or you still have symptoms after 2 weeks of self-care, see your doctor. You may need stronger pain medicines, or you might benefit from .

Each of the various treatments for back pain work for some people but not for others. You may need to try different things to see which work best for you, such as:

  • Spinal manipulation.
  • Massage.
  • Acupuncture.

Having ongoing back pain can make you depressed. In turn, depression can have an effect on your level of pain and whether your back gets better. People with depression and chronic pain often benefit from both antidepressant medicines and counseling. Counseling can help you learn stress management and pain control skills.

When To See A Doctor For Back Pain

Back is one of the most common medical conditions more than eight in 10 of us will experience it during our lifetime. There are many reasons why your back may hurtfrom a to more serious . The type of discomfort ranges from a dull to sharp pain. The most common type of back pain is acutewhich means it goes away within weeks. Chronic back pain lasts longer than three months. Knowing when to see a doctor for is half the battle when it comes to finding relief. Many people continue to function with mild backaches and find relief with at-home care measures. But, its important to know the signs and symptoms of a more serious back problem that requires a professional medical diagnosis and treatment.

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Do I Need To See A Doctor For My Back Pain

If youre still wondering if you should see a doctor for back pain, the short answer is yes. Going to the doctor for your back pain can help you find relief so you can enjoy life once again. At the Desert Institute for Spine Care , you can rest assured our doctors and staff will take good care of you.

At DISC, we believe every patient deserves compassionate, personalized care. We developed Personalized Pain Diagnostics to identify the pain generator and most accurate diagnosis. With PPM we can personalize and tailor the right treatment or surgical option for our patients. We begin by asking questions and listening carefully to your experience. We then investigate your symptoms further through an examination and imaging tests.

Once we develop ideas about your pain, we will discuss them honestly and clearly with you and invite you to ask questions. We want to ensure you feel comfortable and can make an informed decision about your treatment.

When youre ready, well apply the latest technology to treat your pain and help you restore your lifestyle.

To learn more about our innovative treatments for back pain or schedule an appointment, please fill out our contact form or call one of our Phoenix-area locations today.

Holistic And Osteopathic Specialists

Signs You Need to See a Doctor for Back Pain

In the event of chronic or severe back pain, many individuals tend to prefer to see osteopathic or holistic specialists. These types of doctors and professionals include osteopathic physicians and chiropractic specialists.

Osteopaths are put through the same training and licensing/certification processes that all medical doctors must obtain to practice medicine, but they tend to do additional studies of the musculoskeletal system. They then will prefer to treat pain problems medically, but with an additional emphasis on the potential lifestyle and environmental factors which may be contributing to the pain problem.

Chiropractors are trained in the proper alignment of the spine and may be able to provide some of the most immediate relief to back pain problems. This is done through periodic adjustments and treatments that attempt to maintain alignment and prevent further pain issues.

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Pay Attention To Your Body Mechanics And Posture

Body mechanics are the way you use your body. Posture is the way you sit or stand.

  • To prevent a return of low back pain, you will need to take extra care when you lift. When you must lift, bend your knees and flex from your hips. Don’t let your spine slump.
  • Think about your posture, whether you are or standing. Slumping or slouching alone may not cause low back pain. But after the back has been strained or injured, bad posture can make pain worse. “Good posture” generally means your ears, shoulders, and hips are in a straight line. If this posture causes pain, you may have another condition such as a problem with a disc or bones in your back.
  • In Most Cases A Primary Care Doctor Or Chiropractor Can Help You Resolve The Problem

    Low back pain is one of the most common complaints on the planet. And you may wonder where to turn when you start experiencing some of those aches or twinges in the lower part of your back. Take heart. “In most cases, you won’t need a specialist,” says Dr. Robert Shmerling, a rheumatologist at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

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    You Have Unexplained Weight Loss

    If you experience sudden weight loss that can’t be explained by diet and lifestyle changes, then you should always pay attention to what your body is telling you. This is especially true when the unexplained weight loss is accompanied by back pain. See your doctor to rule out the possibility of a more severe condition, such as an infection or tumor.

    Signs That Its Time To Call A Doctor For Your Back Pain

    When Should You See A Doctor For Back Pain

    Most people have experienced back pain at some point in their lives. It’s actually the leading cause of disability worldwide and the most common reason people call out of work. Back pain can come in many different forms, ranging from a dull ache that lasts only a few days to severe pain that lasts for weeks.

    Depending on the intensity of the pain, there are many treatments you can try at home to help. But how do you know when it’s time to stop home remedies and see a physician?

    If any of the following applies to your back pain, then it’s time to make an appointment with a doctor as soon as possible.

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    When To See A Doctor About Your Back And Neck Pain

    How many of us are living with back and neck pain? Perhaps your upper back hurts after every long day at work. Maybe you wake up most mornings with a stiff neck. Or your pain shows up randomly and severely. Each persons spine is unique to their body and their daily routine. But too many of us shrug off the pain as a fact of life.

    How can you know if your back or neck pain is severe enough to schedule a visit with your physician?

    We spoke with Venkat Ganapathy, MD, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in spinal surgery at Banner University Medicine Orthopedics Clinic in Tucson, AZ. He remarked that your bad back isnt something you should just have to live with. Putting off treatment could be a sign of something serious or lead to more severe issues down the road. He outlined a list of common symptoms, breaking them down into categories of severity.

    Diagnosing Back Pain In Adults

    Nearly everyone has back pain at one point or another. In fact, back pain is the second most common pain complaint in the United Statesonly headache is more widespread. People often feel back pain in the lower, or lumbar, region or in the middle, or thoracic, region of the back. Symptoms may include shooting or stabbing pain, tingling or numbness, and intense muscle ache or spasm, along with limited flexibility and difficulty walking or standing up straight.

    Back pain can be caused by a variety of conditions, such as degenerative disc disease, arthritis, spinal stenosis, or osteoporosis. Trauma, muscle tension or spasms, spinal deformities, tumors, or infections can also contribute to back pain.

    The back and spine consist of many parts. The spinal canal is the hollow center of the spine that contains the spinal cord and nerve roots. Surrounding the spinal canal, ring-shaped bones called vertebrae stack on top of one another in an interconnected system of joints that allows spinal flexibility and movement.

    In between each vertebra, a soft disc of flexible connective tissue called cartilage acts as a shock absorber between the bones. A large network of muscles aids in supporting the spine and allows you to bend, twist, lift objects, and walk. Back pain may involve the bones, nerves, muscles, or connective tissues like ligaments, tendons, and cartilage very often it involves all of these structures.

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